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Tuesday, 7 February 2017

Donald Trump Faces Being Banned From Making Speech In Westminster Hall - UK Commons Speaker brands US President 'Racist And Sexist'

Donald Trump WON'T speak in Parliament on UK state visit
Donald Trump faces being banned from making a speech in Westminster Hall on his state visit after Speaker John Bercow said he was 'strong opposed'. The Speaker - one of three 'keyholders' for the ancient hall who must agree to its use - said he had been opposed to the US President addressing MPs and peers before his migrant ban. And he said the ban on migrants from seven majority Muslim countries had increased his opposition. Speaker Bercow was applauded by MPs after his intervention, prompted by a point of order from Labour MP Stephen Doughty.

Speaker Bercow made his extraordinary intervention in the House of Commons today in response to a point of order 
In an extraordinary broadside from the Speaker's chair, he said Mr Trump's controversial ban on migrants from seven majority Muslim countries had left him 'even more strongly opposed' to a speech than he had been.
But Mr Bercow previously had no objections to leaders of controversial regimes including China, Kuwait and Qatar addressing MPs and peers in both houses. 

Speaker John Bercow, pictured rebuking Donald Trump in the Commons today, said his opposition to a speech in Parliament by Donald Trump had been increased by the President's migrant ban
Speaker John Bercow, pictured rebuking Donald Trump in the Commons today, said his opposition to a speech in Parliament by Donald Trump had been increased by the President's migrant ban

The Speaker is one of three 'key holders' for the ancient hall who must agree to its use and if he refuses to cooperate it will be impossible for Theresa May to extend a speaking invitation to the US President. 
Mr Bercow was applauded by MPs after branding Mr Trump racist and sexist but despite its acclaim the tirade is likely to provoke a diplomatic headache in No 10 and at Buckingham Palace.
Mr Trump's executive order provoked protests around the world and has been suspended by US judges as unconstitutional.  


US President Donald Trump speaking to troops at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida

He told MPs: 'What I will say is this: an address by a foreign leader to both Houses of Parliament is not an automatic right, it is an earned honour.
'Moreover, there are many precedents for state visits to take place to our country which do not include an address to both Houses of Parliament.
'Before the imposition of the migrant ban, I would myself have been strongly opposed to an address by President Trump in Westminster Hall.

THREE KEY HOLDERS: THE POWERFUL PEOPLE IN CHARGE OF WESTMINSTER HALL

The use of Westminster Hall is closely guarded by three powerful keyholders.
The ancient hall - the oldest part of the Parliamentary estate that dates back around 1,000 years - has played a pivotal role in UK history.
It is protected by the Speakers of the Commons and Lords and the Great Lord Chamberlain, on behalf of the Queen.
Currently they are John Bercow for the Commons, Lord Fowler for the Lords and David Cholmondeley, 7th Marquess of Cholmondeley for the Queen. 
Speeches in the hall are rare. US President Barack Obama, South African President Nelson Mandela and Burma freedom fighter Aung San Suu Kyi are among the select few.
Events cannot take place without the agreement of the key holders.'After the imposition of the migrant ban by President Trump I am even more strongly opposed to an address by President Trump in Westminster Hall.' 
Mr Bercow said he has less influence over whether a speech could be made by President Trump in the Royal Gallery because it is in a different part of the building.
But he told MPs it was customary for an invitation to be sent in the names of both speakers of Parliament - himself and Lords Speaker Lord Fowler.
'I would not wish to issue an invitation to President Trump to speak in the Royal Gallery,' he told MPs.
Mr Bercow concluded: 'We value our relationship with the United States; if a state visit takes place that is way beyond and above the pay grade of the Speaker.
'However, as far as this place is concerned I feel very strongly that our opposition to racism and to sexism and our support for equality before the law and an independent judiciary are hugely important considerations in the House of Commons.'
The speech was in response to a point of order raised by Labour MP Stephen Doughty.
He spoke to highlight a Commons motion opposing Mr Trump's speech. It has been signed by 163 MPs - mostly from Labour and the SNP.
But the intervention was slammed by ex-Ukip leader Nigel Farage who said: 'For Speaker Bercow to uphold our finest parliamentary traditions, he should be neutral.'
No 10 sources played down the intervention, insisting the itinerary for the visit had not been set and would be discussed 'in due course'. 


Via - Dailymail

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